Oct 21, 2021  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Course Numbering System

001-099 Developmental Courses (Credit Type DV*)
100-299 Lower division courses; may have prerequisites
300-499 Upper division courses
500-599 Foundational graduate courses and Education graduate certification courses
600-699 Graduate courses

*DV - Developmental courses completed at Avila count toward Term hours, Term GPA and Career GPA, but are not counted in Career hours. Developmental courses completed at another institution are counted in Term hours and Term GPA, but are not counted in Career hours or Career GPA.

Catalog Course Information

The number in parentheses after the course title indicates the credit in semester hours.

The letters following the course description indicate the semester in which the course is given. Fall semester course offerings are indicated by FA; spring semester, SP; summer session, SU. Where frequency of course offering is not indicated, the course is given as required.

 

Computer Science

  
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    CS 319 - Web Page Programming (3)

    A continuation of Web Page Design. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, XHTML, Cascading Style Sheets, JavaScript, Dynamic HTML, graphic manipulation software, Web page design software, XML, and discussion covering several server-based programming languages. Prerequisites: CS 170 . FA.
  
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    CS 321 - Networking (3)

    Considers a wide range of concepts used in the design and implementation of modern network systems. Course content will be organized according to the TCP/IP and the OSI models. Among topics that will be included are hardware components, protocol suites (especially TCP/IP), network topologies, IEEE 802.3 networks, bridging, and routing. Prerequisites: CS 222  and MA 120 . FA.
  
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    CS 340 - Database Management (3)

    Studies of database management systems including database requirements, ER modeling, relational database modeling, database design, normalization and semantic data modeling, and database implementation and use.  Students will design databases and program in SQL. Prerequisites: CS 222 , MA 120  and MA 121  or MA 125 . FA.
  
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    CS 345 - Computer Organization & Architecture (3)

    Studies the principles used in designing and implementing digital computer systems. Topics include Boolean algebra and gates, basic digital logic circuits, memory circuits, buses, CPU organization, microarchitecture organization, data representation, instruction set design, and addressing modes. As time allows, a variety of operating system and machine language concepts will be included. Prerequisites: CS 222 , MA 120  and MA 121  or MA 125 . SP, odd years.
  
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    CS 346 - Foundations of Computing (3)

    Considers the mathematical underpinning of computer science. The course includes topics such as finite automata, regular expressions, grammars, languages, push-down automata, Turing machines, solvability, complexity, and Church’s Thesis. Prerequisites: MA 230  and CS 222 . FA, SP.
  
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    CS 356 - Visual COBOL Programming (3)

    Focuses on object-oriented Visual COBOL within Visual Studio. Will cover the basic language syntax and look at fundamental data structures. Emphasis will be on an understanding of the Visual Studio IDE. Prerequisite: CS 167 . FA.
  
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    CS 365 - Program Language Systems (3)

    Description and analysis of key issues in the design and implementation of programming languages, including syntax and semantic specification, lexical analysis and parsing, names and binding, data types, expressions and assignments, control structures, subprogram calling and parameter passing, data abstraction, and objects. As time allows, concurrency, functional programming, and logical programming will be included. Prerequisites: CS 222 , MA 120 , and CS 165  or CS 166 . SP.
  
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    CS 368 - COBOL for Java Programming (3)

    This class will provide the essential COBOL programming language skills for experienced Java programmers to convert existing COBOL code to Java. This will enable organizations to move from a COBOL code base to Java. Prerequisite: CS 166  or consent of instructor. SP.
  
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    CS 371 - Android App Development 3

    This course will enable experienced Java programmers to apply the core Java language features needed to develop maintainable mobile apps using the core Android components. Prerequisite: CS 314 . FA.
  
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    CS 372 - IOS App Development 3

    This course will introduce you to iOS app development in Swift, a new programming language from Apple, and serves as your launching point into the world of professional app development. Prerequisite: CS 313 . FA.
  
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    CS 373 - Introduction to Game Development 3

    This class will introduce you to game development using Python and the PyGame library. The course will cover game design, artifact creation, Sprite processing, physics of game applications, and development of game systems. Prerequisites: CS 371  or CS 372 . SP.
  
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    CS 374 - Math & Physics for Gamers (3)

    This course will cover the applied math and physics necessary to create more realistic games in which objects behave just as in real life.  It will concentrate on Trigonometry and Algebra applications and applications pertaining to the concepts of Physics. Prerequisites: PH 117  and (MA 125  or (MA 120  and MA 121 )) and CS 373 . FA.
  
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    CS 375 - App Project (3)

    In this course students will apply the skills learned in the App Development concentration to design and develop an App or game on either the Android or IOS platform.  Students will be encouraged to identify and solve a particular problem using a mobile App or to translate a game idea into an electronic reality. Prerequisites: (CS 371  or CS 372 ) and CS 373  and CS 374 . SP.
  
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    CS 380 - Advanced Special Topics (1-3)

    A study of advanced specialized topics in computer science. May not meet requirements for Computer Science or Software Engineering Majors. Prerequisites will vary.
  
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    CS 440 - Security & Compliance (3)

    Students will be exposed to a wide spectrum of security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures with emphasis on practical aspects of Information Security. Topics include security principles, threats, attacks, security models, security policies and overview of authentication, encryption and certifications, security detection, risk analysis, protection of information assets, examination of pre- and post-incident procedures, and an overview of information security. Prerequisite: CS 321 .
  
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    CS 480 - Special Topics (3)

    A study of specialized topics in computer science. May not meet requirements for Computer Science or Software Engineering majors. FA, SP, SU.
  
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    CS 485 - Practicum (3)

    Participatory computer experience working in a department or office on campus. The placement will be selected with the Computer Science faculty approval, based on campus need and availability. Prerequisites: CS 222  and Junior standing. FA, SP.
  
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    CS 490 - Directed Study (1-3)

    In-depth study of an approved topic not covered in other computer science courses. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
  
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    CS 495 - Internship (3)

    Participatory computer experience working for a company or non-profit organization. The choice of organization and type of work is to be determined by the student but must be approved in advance by a Computer Science faculty member who will coordinate the student’s placement. Prerequisites: CS 222 , MA 120  and MA 121  or MA 125 , and Senior standing. 2015 CORE: Community Engagement. FA, SP.
  
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    CS 499 - Computer Science Capstone (3)

    Provides opportunity for students to integrate learning from throughout their Computer Science coursework. Students will do major projects requiring mastery of complex computer science skills and concepts and do literature reviews from computer science scholarly literature. Meets the Capstone requirement in the major. Prerequisites: CS 222 , MA 120  and MA 121  or MA 125 , and Senior standing. FA, SP.

Software Engineering

  
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    SF 195 - Introduction to Computer Careers (1)

    Considers career opportunities available to computer scientists and software engineers. Students will research the various opportunities and will interview and observe computer professionals. Students will discuss and report on what they learn about the skills, attitudes, and knowledge areas that contribute to success of computer professionals. Prerequisite: CS 120 .  SP.
  
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    SF 201 - Introduction to Software Engineering (3)

    Study of the tools and techniques used in the lifecycle of large software system.  Topics include waterfall, iterative, incremental, and agile software development practices; phases of the software lifecycle (e.g. requirements analysis, specifications, design, coding, testing); Unified Modeling Language and other tools for modeling and designing various aspects of software systems; quality assurance and testing. Prerequisite: CS 120 .  FA.
  
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    SF 315 - Operating Systems (3)

    A study of operating system concepts and how those concepts are used in the design and implementation of modern operating systems. Topics include process management, processor scheduling, memory management, virtual memory, I/O, file systems, deadlocks, and concurrency. Prerequisites: CS 222 , MA 120  and MA 121  or MA 125 .  SP.
  
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    SF 340 - Database Management (3)

    Studies of database management systems including database requirements, ER modeling, relational database modeling, database design, normalization and semantic data modeling, and database implementation and use. Students will design databases and program in SQL. Prerequisites: CS 222 , MA 120  and MA 121  or MA 125 . FA.
  
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    SF 350 - Systems Analysis & Design (3)

    In-depth discussion of the methodologies for designing and implementing computer-based systems. The course considers how to break the software system lifecycle into phases and the activities and products of each phase (especially those dealing with analysis and design). Case studies are used to emphasize the points covered. Prerequisites: CS 120 , MA 120 , and CS 165  or CS 166 . SP.
  
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    SF 495 - Internship (3)

    Participatory software engineering experience working for a company or non-profit organization. The choice of organization and type of work is to be determined by the student but must be approved in advance by a Computer Science faculty member who will coordinate the student’s placement. Prerequisite: CS 222 MA 120  and MA 121  or MA 125 , and Senior standing. 2015 CORE: Community Engagement. FA, SP.
  
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    SF 499 - Software Engineering Capstone (3)

    Provides opportunity for students to integrate learning from throughout their Software Engineering coursework. Students will do major projects requiring mastery of complex software engineering skills and concepts and do literature reviews from software engineering scholarly literature. Prerequisites: CS 222 MA 120  and MA 121  or MA 125 , and Senior standing. FA, SP.

Dance

  
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    DA 110 - Basic Tap (2)

    Learn the basics of tap terminology and steps and apply them to the art of performance.
  
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    DA 111 - Jazz Technique I (2)

    Introduction to rhythmic awareness, movement coordination, and jazz styles through performance of dance combinations.
  
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    DA 112 - Modern Dance Technique I (2)

    Introduces the expressive potential of dance through modern dance technique. Emphasis on flexibility, strength, and alignment practiced through standing and floor exercises. Movement improvisation explores qualities of motion.
  
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    DA 114 - Ballet (2)

    Emphasizes discipline, coordination, and developing practical performing skills in classical ballet technique. Includes barre and floor combinations.
  
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    DA 311 - Jazz Technique II (2)

    Advanced study of jazz dance with emphasis on technique, flexibility, balance, control, and retaining long combinations in a variety of jazz styles.
  
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    DA 312 - Modern Dance Technique II (2)

    Continued study of modern dance at an advanced level. Emphasis on release techniques, rhythmic precision, and spatial principles through extended combinations and movement improvisations.
  
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    DA 314 - Dance & Culture (2)

    This course examines theatrical forms of dance in historical and cultural contexts. Through readings, lecture, videotaped performance, and studio experiences, this course focuses on the conceptual components of dance while exploring various dance styles: folk and ethnic dances of Europe, Near and Far East, Africa, and the Americas as they relate to concert dance.
  
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    DA 360 - Choreography (3)

    Exploration of the choreographic processes. Focus on seed phrases to create solo material, introduction of musically derived choreographic forms, and work with compositional elements of space, time, and energy.

Economics

  
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    EC 195 - Survey of Economics (3)

    A one semester course providing a general overview of the main concepts of both microeconomics and macroeconomics. For non-business majors only. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II.
  
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    EC 202 - Principles of Microeconomics (3)

    An introduction to the theory of consumer and producer, or firm, behavior with an emphasis on the analysis of prices, markets, production, and resource allocation. Prerequisite: MA 115  or higher.  2015 CORE: Exploration of Nature, Acquire. FA, SP.
  
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    EC 203 - Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

    An introduction to the fundamental economic concepts and principles, capitalism, legal forms of business enterprises, determination of national income, and monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisite: MA 115  or higher and EC 202 . 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life. Acquire. FA, SP.
  
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    EC 240 - Statistical Analysis (3)

    Introduction to basic statistical techniques for students in business and economics. Prerequisites: MA 120  and CS 210 . FA, SP.
  
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    EC 241 - Quantitative Analysis (3)

    An introduction to quantitative analysis techniques needed to apply models to actual situations in business and economics. Prerequisites: EC 240 . FA, SP.
  
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    EC 311 - Intermediate Macroeconomics (3)

    Expansion of principles of macroeconomic concepts, theories, and models. Prerequisite: EC 202  and EC 203 .
  
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    EC 312 - Intermediate Microeconomics (3)

    Expansion of principles of microeconomic concepts, theories, and models. Prerequisites: EC 202  and EC 240 . SP, odd years.
  
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    EC 340 - Statistical Analysis II: Regression (3)

    Regression analysis examines the use of both single and multiple variables in establishing causality. Answering a question of causality with regression permits the student to determine how well the regression model answers that question. Students will develop testable hypotheses that form the question to be asked. The course will also prepare the student to do basic forecasting. Prerequisite: EC 240 . FA, odd years.
  
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    EC 361 - Money & Banking (3)

    Investigation of the money, credit, and banking structure and money’s influence on the national economy and foreign exchange. Prerequisites: EC 202  and EC 203 .
  
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    EC 380 - Special Topics (1-3)

    Selected topics to be determined at the discretion of the department.
  
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    EC 382 - International Economics (3)

    An introduction to the theory, structure, and policies of international trade and international financial institutions. Prerequisites: EC 202  and EC 203 . Every third semester.
  
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    EC 490 - Directed Studies in Economics (1-6)

    Study of an approved topic not parallel with the content of another course.
  
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    EC 499 - Economics Seminar (1-3)

    Study of contemporary economic issues. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Education

  
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    ED 101 - Strategies for Academic Success (3)

    This course will focus on general study strategies including time management, goal setting, learning styles, and memory.  The course will also include information on critical thinking skills and the application of those skills in learning from lectures, reading, writing, and synthesizing various forms of information to maximize learning at the college level.  Outcomes will be measured through classroom observations, quizzes, writing assignments, group work, projects, individual meetings, and examinations. FA, SP.
  
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    ED 105 - Intro to Education & Teaching Profession (3)

    Serves as an introductory course in education for high school students participating in Avila University’s Grow Your Own partnership program. Students will explore topics such as the teaching profession, best practices and teaching effectiveness, foundations of education, and the future of education. FA.
  
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    ED 184 - Introduction to Educational Technology (1)

    The central focus of this course is the use of technology as a catalyst for changing teaching and learning in ways that better support the acquisition of higher-order thinking skills by all students. Thus, the course will include an introduction to the National Educational Technology Standards and the historical and current trends in educational technology addressing specifically national standards and how they impact learning/schools; profiles of NETS (National Education Teaching Standards) for teachers and students; integration of the standards into the classroom; and analysis, evaluation, and creation of media and its effect on schools, learning, and society. This course can only be taken at Avila University. Corequisite: ED 185 . FA.
  
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    ED 185 - Practicum (3)

    Pre-service experience with a TEXT mentor in a K-12 classroom. Serves as an early screening process for teacher candidates. Course requires observation/participation which must be met during regular K-12 school days. Candidates will meet on-campus, program policy, and reflective writing. This course is an important part of formal admission to the School of Education. Developmental recommendations may be made as a result of this course. Practicum can only be taken at Avila University. Transportation is required. If necessary, candidates will be allowed to retake Practicum one time. Fee is required and non-refundable due to the security background check requirement. Field-based experience required. Corequisite: ED 184 . FA.
  
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    ED 206 - Creative Activities & Physical Movement (3)

    The course gives the preparing teacher knowledge to understand the importance of the arts and physical education as well as strategies and skills to help children express themselves in a variety of creative ways using art, music, drama, and physical movement. Activities are presented and practiced to enrich and enhance teaching of academic subjects through these modalities. Field-based assignment required. Course is open to teacher education students only. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Transform. SP.
  
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    ED 207 - Geometry for Elementary & Middle School Teachers (3)

    Development of non-metric geometry of the plane and space, measurement of lengths and angles, simple closed curves, and congruent and similar figures. These topics are treated with attention to the pedagogical and content needs of elementary and middle school students and teachers. Prerequisite: Foundations math with a grade of “C” or better. FA.
  
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    ED 229 - Developmental & Educational Psychology (3)

    An in-depth exploration of learning and motivation theory and cognitive, moral, psychological, and physical development. Additional topics include an examination of social-emotional difficulties of children and the influence of classroom environment on learning. Focuses on understanding methods needed to maintain an effective learning environment through classroom management strategies and motivational techniques through knowledge gained from educational psychologists in learning theory and practice. FA.
  
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    ED 230 - Children’s Literature (3)

    Extensive reading of children’s literature; criteria for selection and evaluation of books; relation of literature to the reading program and to children’s needs, abilities, and interests; and the integration of literature across the curriculum. Metacognitive reader-response strategies supporting student learning are also addressed. Field-based assignment required. FA.
  
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    ED 234 - Social Marginalization in Education (3)

    This course will examine poverty and social marginalization in a global context with an emphasis on poverty and gender’s relationship to education and child development. An analysis of social marginalization dynamics will include a deeper look at issues impacting educational access. Strategies for expanding educational access to support cognitive and socio-emotional development for high risk populations will be addressed. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Transform, Civic Engagement. SP.
  
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    ED 235 - Psychology of the Exceptional Child (3)

    Designed to provide an introduction to the various areas of exceptionality (gifted, intellectually disabled, learning disabled, emotionally disturbed). Social, educational, and cognitive characteristics of exceptional children are explored. Samples of the unique teaching methods, materials, and techniques of instruction are discussed. In addition, laws and regulations covering exceptional students are presented. Field-based assignment required. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Transform. SP.
  
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    ED 245 - Tests & Measurements (3)

    A study of the role of evaluation in the instructional process, standards-based information and assessment, and basic statistical concepts and common terminology related to educational measurement. Practice in developing classroom tests, preparation of outcomes, and the study of performance-based assessment are provided as well as information regarding commonly used formal tests in school districts. SP.
  
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    ED 287 - Multicultural Foundations of Education (3)

    This course will provide an examination of education including philosophical, historical, and social foundations; teaching as a profession; diversity and multicultural issues in education; critical questions; and other innovations. All levels of schooling are explored including elementary, middle school, and secondary education. 2015 CORE: Global Studies. FA.
  
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    ED 301 - Comparative Structures & Functions of Education (3)

    This course will compare current educational practices, methodologies, systems, and functions across countries, nations, and cultures. It will examine the historical practices and traditions that have shaped education in a variety of cultures and settings. Commonalities in systems as well as features that make education unique around the world will be identified and examined. FA.
  
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    ED 308 - Math Methods for Elementary Teachers (3)

    Basic concepts and number processes with emphasis on mathematics and teaching methods appropriate to the needs of elementary school children. Field-based assignment required. Prerequisite: Foundations math with a grade of “C” or better. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ED 315 . SP.
  
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    ED 309 - Teaching Physical Education (2)

    This course is designed to provide the physical education teacher with the necessary knowledge, skills, and experiences for successful teaching in physical education. It will help the physical education teacher-in-training understand the importance of quality physical education and how to integrate the spectrum of methods used to teach physical education in grades K-12. Topics will include classroom management, physical education standards and curriculum, diverse learners and needs in the physical education classroom, and best practices to become critical thinkers, creative planners, and effective practitioners in the area of physical education. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ED 315 . FA.
  
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    ED 311 - International Teaching Skills, Methods, & Assessments (3)

    This course will explore developmentally appropriate teaching strategies, methods, and assessments that can be embedded into existing curricula or used to create new curricula to facilitate affective, social, and cognitive aspects of education. Factors such as perspectives, filters, cultural contexts, language, customs, and other forms of diversity will be studied. SP.
  
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    ED 313 - Test Prep for Educators (1)

    This course provides students with resources and strategies to successfully prepare for the suite of state required exams for teacher certification.  Participants will take a deeper look at the Missouri General Education Assessment (MoGEA) and Missouri Content Assessments (MoCA) to develop a personalized preparation strategy.  Topics will include resources for content review, overcoming test anxiety, and strategies for approaching standardized test questions. This course may be repeated. FA, SP, SU.
  
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    ED 314 - Methods & Educational Technology (1)

    The focus of this course is teaching candidates to use technology for differentiating instruction to meet the needs of every student in every lesson. The course provides critical tools to meet the demands of teachers and learners. Candidates will explore how to differentiate instruction using technologies such as internet, wikis, blogs, podcasts, photo sharing, virtual offices, simulation and game-based learning, and other emerging technologies. This course explores learning-theory research and its applications for technology-enriched, standards-based units of study. Students will study theories of constructivism, multiple intelligences, and other research related to how people learn. Participants will learn how technology applications can be used to create learning environments that strengthen problem-solving skills and encourage communication, collaboration, and reflection. Prerequisite: ED 184 , ED 185 , successfully passing of all sections of the MoGEA (undergraduates) and official admission to the School of Education. Corequisite: ED 315 . FA.
  
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    ED 315 - General Methods & Differentiated Learning (3)

    This course addresses theories and principles of pedagogy; developing and writing objectives; steps in lesson planning; and selection and application of appropriate procedures, methods, techniques, and assessments. Exploration of learning styles, trends, and issues are discussed. Course serves as the mid-level field-based placement. Course requires a 45-hour placement in a K-12 classroom of a TEXT mentor. Course requires daytime flexibility to accomplish the field-based placement. General Methods can only be taken at Avila University. Credit for taking this course at another institution not accepted. Transportation required. Fee required. Field-based placement required. Prerequisites: ED 184 , ED 185 , successfully passing of all sections of the MoGEA (undergraduates) and official admission to the School of Education. Corequisite: ED 314 . 2015 CORE: Community Engagement. FA.
  
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    ED 322 - Language & Literacy in the Global Context (3)

    This course explores the development of language as the foundation for literacy. It further examines how language and literacy are interrelated and presents multiple perspectives on the definition of “literacy” in developing nations and the industrialized world. Cultural, social, and political factors impacting literacy acquisition will be addressed as well as the role of schools as social systems. Strategies for promoting literacy in multiple contexts will be presented. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Transform, Global Studies. SP.
  
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    ED 326 - Coordination of Cooperative Education (3)

    This course focuses on the establishment and oversight of cooperative education programs. Emphasis is placed on occupational preparation and the importance of building partnerships and rapport with members of the business community. Corequisite: ED 382 . FA, intermittently.
  
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    ED 333 - International Advocacy Field Experience I (3)

    This course serves as an initial field experience to introduce students to various educational and advocacy opportunities in the community. Students are mentored by experienced educators and advocates who model best practices. Students are supervised by university supervisors throughout the experience. Students participate in extended work in a school or advocacy program which serves the needs of children, youth, and families. Students will gain awareness of existing opportunities for service and advocacy within the local community. 2015 Core: Belief & Reason, Contribute. FA, SP.
  
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    ED 337 - Elementary Social Studies Methods (3)

    Exploration of instructional models based on concept formation, inquiry, and diversity. Theories, methods, and principles of pedagogy are discussed in general and applied specifically to the teaching of social studies in elementary classrooms. Transportation is required. Field-based assignment required. Prerequisite or corequisite: ED 314  and ED 315 . FA.
  
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    ED 340 - Elementary Science Methods (2)

    Exploration of methods for planning and teaching units of study in science. Experiments, cooperative group work, and alternative ways of presenting material in science. Field-based assignment required. Prerequisites or corequisites: ED 314  and ED 315 . SP.
  
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    ED 341 - Foundations of Literacy & Language Development (3)

    This course examines literacy acquisition through the elementary school years, building upon a strong foundation of oral language and extending through a balanced literacy program.  Topics such as word recognition strategies, vocabulary development, reading comprehension, and critical thinking will be explored. Field-based assignment required. Prerequisites or Corequisites: ED 314  and ED 315 . FA.
  
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    ED 343 - Language Arts Methods (2)

    This course will examine oral and written language development and how this is facilitated and integrated into a balanced literacy program. Theories and objectives for teaching language arts in the elementary classroom will be studied. Strategies for teaching written language will be explored. Field-based assignment required. Prerequisites or corequisites: ED 314  and ED 315 . SP.
  
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    ED 353 - Analysis & Characteristics: Cross Categorical (4)

    In-depth study of the theories and characteristics of behavior disorders, learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and physical orthopedic and health disorders. Theories and practices of cross-categorical placements will be discussed. Legal implications, identification procedures, and diagnostic procedures will be studied. Field-based assignment required. Prerequisite: ED 235 . Prerequisites or Corequisites: ED 314 , ED 315 , and ED 341 . FA, intermittently.
  
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    ED 358 - Methods & Curriculum: Cross Categorical (4)

    Selection of appropriate teaching methods and materials applicable for teaching children in cross-categorical settings will be the focus of study. Multi-Tiered Support Systems (MTSS) and methods for adapting curricular materials will be addressed. Field-based placement required. Prerequisite: ED 353 . SP, intermittently.
  
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    ED 361 - Language Acquisition & Development (3)

    Exploration of speech and language problems associated with children with exceptionalities, normal speech and language development, indications for referral, and educational techniques. Field-based assignment required. Prerequisite: ED 235 . Prerequisite or Corequisite: ED 343 . FA, intermittently.
  
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    ED 363 - Educational Assessment (3)

    An analysis and study of selected topics pertinent to the assessment of educational functioning. Emphasis will be on diagnostic assessment, both formal and informal, to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of learning problems occurring in special education settings or with children needing individualized programming in general education classrooms. Candidates will administer, score, and interpret several of the currently used assessment instruments in addition to data collection utilized in the RTI model. Fee required. Field-based assignment required. Prerequisite: ED 245 . SP, intermittently.
  
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    ED 364 - Consultation, Collaboration & Family Engagement: Special Education (1)

    Exploration of methods to be used in conferencing situations with an emphasis on working with parents in the development of an I.E.P. Interpreting progress, discussions of various assessments including state requirements. Emphasis on developing relationships with parents and families of exceptional children to increase student learning. FA, intermittently.
  
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    ED 365 - Consultation, Collaboration & Family Engagement: Elementary (1)

    Exploration of methods to be used in conferencing situations, emphasis on developing a partnership with the parents and families of children to increase student learning. FA.
  
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    ED 366 - Consultation, Collaboration & Family Engagement: Middle/Secondary (1)

    Exploration of methods for communicating with parents of the middle and high school student. Involvement of the parents and family in the school community is stressed. SP.
  
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    ED 367 - Transition/Career Education (2)

    Exploration of methods for helping children with exceptionalities successfully make the transition from school to employment with emphasis on appropriate transition goals and objectives. Legal and ethical considerations are explored. Prerequisite: ED 235 . FA, intermittently.
  
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    ED 370 - Assessment & Remediation of Reading Problems (3)

    This course explores the diagnostic and reflective teaching of reading. Emphasis is on assessment and instruction that appropriately supports children at various stages of reading development. Prerequisites: ED 314 , ED 315 , and ED 341 . Corequisite: ED 386 . FA.
  
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    ED 375 - Reading Strategies & Interventions in the Content Areas (3)

    Candidates will learn strategies for teaching reading, writing, speaking, and listening in the content areas. Methods of teaching effective comprehensive vocabulary and study skills will be presented. Candidates will practice techniques for adapting materials and supporting challenged readers. Field-based assignment required. Prerequisite or corequisite: ED 314  and ED 315 . FA, odd years.
  
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    ED 377 - Adolescent Literature (3)

    Study of adolescent literature, how to analyze and engage students, and ways to incorporate literature and promote reader-response in middle school and secondary classrooms. Primarily for middle school and secondary English education candidates but open to other education students. Prerequisite: one lower level literature course. FA, intermittently.
  
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    ED 380 - Special Topics (1-3)

    Special topics courses will focus on important issues in the field and explore the issues from critical perspectives. These classes will utilize outside experts as instructors as well as full-time faculty. They will provide opportunities for students to choose topics of particular interest and investigate them further. FA, SP, SU.
  
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    ED 381 - Health & Safety Issues in a School Setting (1)

    Presents an overview of health and safety issues related to school settings. Candidates will experience learning activities to increase knowledge and skills in dealing with emergency and first aid situations. Candidates will earn CPR and first aid certification as well as receive bloodborne pathogen training. Health issues such as eating disorders, nutrition, substance abuse, and depression will be covered, and the teacher’s role in dealing with these situations will be discussed. CPR/First aid certification must be current during Final Clinical Experience. For Education majors/minors only. Fee required. Prerequisite: Advisor approval needed. FA, SP.
  
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    ED 382 - Implementing Business Education Programs (3)

    This course is designed to prepare business education and vocational teachers for administratively managing aspects of vocational, career, and business training programs. It will address issues of history, funding, regulatory and legislative requirements, teaching strategies, experiential learning, program evaluation, community resources, and other relevant topics. FA, intermittently.
  
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    ED 386 - Reading Practicum (2)

    Reading practicum is delivered in a case study format, on-site at a partner elementary school. Candidates will design one-on-one lessons for and provide instruction to an elementary child who needs reading support across the semester. Transportation required. Field-based placement required. Prerequisite: ED 314 , ED 315 , and ED 341 . Corequisite: ED 370 . FA.
  
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    ED 390 - Directed Study (1-3)

    Opportunity for the candidate to study a topic of interest in depth. Consent of instructor, advisor and School of Education Dean required. FA, SP.
  
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    ED 419 - Managing the Learning Environment (3)

    This course explores theories, techniques, and current research concerning behavior management and discipline in classrooms and schools. The emphasis is on a proactive, integrated method of discipline. By the end of the course, each candidate will have produced his/her own discipline plan. Field-based assignment required. Prerequisite: Instructor approval needed. 2015 CORE: Explorations of Nature, Transform. SP.
  
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    ED 430 - School & Community Connections (3)

    This course introduces theory, strategy, and practices for making school and community connections in local, national, and international contexts. It addresses community and advocacy involvement in schools, school disaster preparedness, violence prevention, and rebuilding of schools, educational programs, and related community services when disasters occur. The course introduces students to histories and authorities of emergency management. It introduces national and international case studies as a means of exploring connections. Past successes and principles of promoting connections are applied to current situations. FA.
  
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    ED 433 - International Advocacy Field Experience II (3)

    This course is a structured civic engagement experience which requires participation in a program that serves the educational and developmental needs of children, youth, and/or families. Students will apply knowledge gained from coursework and prior field experiences to contribute to a child-, youth-, or family-serving agency or community organization. Students are highly encouraged to explore and gain experience internationally; international, national, or local sites may be considered with pre-approval by the advisor and instructor. This field experience may be coupled with semester length study abroad opportunities. Prerequisite: ED 333 , advisor and instructor permission required. FA, SP.
  
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    ED 454 - Middle School Philosophy & Organization (3)

    The knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to understand the basic organizational structure of the middle school and the necessary competencies to teach in an organization that stresses teamwork and collaboration will be addressed. The course will provide simulated interdisciplinary team experiences, the opportunities to examine flexible grouping arrangements, block scheduling, effective school components, and student advising into the total school program. Field-based assignment required. Prerequisite or corequisite: ED 314 , ED 315 . SP.
  
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    ED 455 - Special Methods of Teaching Content Subjects (2)

    Exploration of the specialized methods and procedures for content area teaching including unit preparation and lesson design. This course meets at the K-12 school site. It includes a minimum of 20 hours of field-work in a TEXT mentor’s classroom. This course includes a video teaching assignment at the placement site. Transportation and field-based placement required. Prerequisite: ED 314  and ED 315 . FA, SP.
  
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    ED 494 - Final Clinical Experience Seminar (2)

    Final Clinical Experience Seminar is a companion course to Final Clinical Experience. Seminar requires professional writing and reflections (with Avila University supervisor and instructor) and job search documents (resumé, cover letters, and thank you letters) to potential employers. Additionally, the course covers pertinent professional topics. Corequisite: ED 495 . FA, SP.
  
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    ED 495 - Final Clinical Experience (10)

    Co-teaching in a classroom setting with supervision and guidance shared between the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. Application must be made in advance of registration date. A teacher candidate may be removed from the Final Clinical Experience school site based on the recommendations of the school district or any of its agents, Avila University supervisors, or the Director of Clinical and Field-based Experiences. If a teacher candidate is removed from the Final Clinical Experience, the teacher candidate will not be eligible for re-entry into the program nor eligible for a recommendation for certification. Transportation required. Fee required. Prerequisites: admittance to the School of Education, admittance to Final Clinical Experience, and all major and minor requirements completed. Corequisite: ED 494 . 2015 CORE: Belief & Reason, Contribute. FA, SP.
  
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    ED 498 - Options in Modern Education (3)

    This course is intended to provide opportunities for students to explore nontraditional career options in the field of education by engaging with professionals outside of traditional classrooms. Students will interview, shadow, research, read about, and investigate options. They will prepare employment seeking materials to help them move forward in advancing their career objectives. This is the Capstone course for the Bachelor of Science in Educational Studies. Approval of the School of Education Dean is required. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education. FA, SP, intermittently.

ESL Studies

  
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    EL 031 - Conversation & Pronunciation I (2)

    This two credit hour course provides students with a foundation in conversation and pronunciation. The course focuses on conversation and pronunciation through pair and group work. It also allows students to practice their conversation skills in a more informal manner in relation to everyday life situations. Furthermore, students will improve their pronunciation skills by examining rules and applying them in class. ILCP students only. SU.
  
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    EL 032 - Conversation & Pronunciation II (2)

    This two credit hour course provides students with advanced conversation and pronunciation practice. The course focuses on conversation and pronunciation through pair and group work. It also allows students to practice their conversation skills in a more informal manner in relation to everyday life situations. Furthermore, students will improve their pronunciation skills by examining rules and applying them in class. ILCP students only. SU.
 

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