Jun 05, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Course Numbering System

001-099 Developmental Courses (Credit Type DV*)
100-299 Lower division courses; may have prerequisites
300-499 Upper division courses
500-599 Foundational graduate courses and Education graduate certification courses
600-699 Graduate courses

*DV - Developmental courses completed at Avila count toward Term hours, Term GPA and Career GPA, but are not counted in Career hours. Developmental courses completed at another institution are counted in Term hours and Term GPA, but are not counted in Career hours or Career GPA.

Catalog Course Information

The number in parentheses after the course title indicates the credit in semester hours.

The letters following the course description indicate the semester in which the course is given. Fall semester course offerings are indicated by FA; spring semester, SP; summer session, SU. Where frequency of course offering is not indicated, the course is given as required.

 

Other Courses

  
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    CF COMM - Communication (3)

    Core Foundations requirement for Communication. 3 credit hours are required with a grade of C or better.
  
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    CF COMP - Composition (3)

    Core Foundations requirement for Composition. 3 credit hours are required with a grade of C or better.
  
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    CF MATH - Mathematics (3-5)

    Core Foundations requirement for Mathematics. 3-5 credit hours are required with a grade of C or better.

Accounting

  
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    AC 201 - Principles of Accounting I (3)

    Introduction to the terminology, concepts, and procedures of accounting. Prerequisites: MA 115  or higher. FA.
  
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    AC 202 - Principles of Accounting II (3)

    Accounting for corporations and manufacturing firms; also involves analyzing financial statements. Prerequisite: AC 201 . SP.
  
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    AC 355 - Cost Accounting (3)

    Accounting for product and period costs, with emphasis on cost relationships, cost determination, and the use of quantitative techniques. Required for Accounting Majors. Prerequisite: AC 202 . SP.
  
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    AC 361 - Intermediate Accounting I (3)

    Review of the accounting process, extensive study of working capital accounts and operational assets. Prerequisite: AC 202 . FA.
  
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    AC 362 - Intermediate Accounting II (3)

    Study of long-term assets and debts, stockholders’ equity, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: AC 202 . SP.
  
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    AC 365 - Accounting Information Systems (3)

    Study of the design and use of the accounting information system within the organization. Prerequisites: AC 202  and CS 210 . FA, as needed.
  
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    AC 370 - Auditing (3)

    Study of the verification of accounting records for financial audits, with emphasis on the ethical and legal aspects of the auditor’s work. Prerequisite/Corequisite: AC 362 . SP.
  
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    AC 380 - Accounting Special Topics (1-3)

    Selected topics to be determined at the discretion of the department.
  
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    AC 451 - Tax Accounting I (3)

    Detailed discussion of the fundamental aspects of federal income taxation as applied to individuals. Prerequisite: AC 202 . FA.
  
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    AC 452 - Tax Accounting II (3)

    Study of federal income taxation as applied to corporations and partnerships; introduction to tax planning. Prerequisite: AC 451 . SP.
  
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    AC 455 - Advanced Cost Accounting (3)

    A study of additional cost accounting techniques, emphasizing advanced applications. Topics include the use of process costing to determine product cost for manufactured goods, accounting for normal and abnormal spoilage in the manufacturing process, the allocation of joint costs to two or more products or services, and methods to account for byproducts. In addition, alternative methods to evaluate long-term capital projects and to evaluate organizational performance are discussed. Prerequisite: AC 355 . FA.
  
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    AC 460 - Advanced Accounting (3)

    Advanced study of accounting procedures and theories applicable to consolidations and partnerships, bankruptcies, estates, and trusts. Prerequisite: AC 362 . FA.
  
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    AC 475 - Accounting Theory (3)

    Study of not-for-profit accounting, international accounting, and the development of accounting theory. Meets the Capstone course requirement in the major. Prerequisite: AC 362 . SP.
  
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    AC 490 - Directed Studies in Accounting (1-6)

    Study of an approved topic not parallel with the content of another course.
  
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    AC 495 - Accounting Internship (1-6)

    Structured learning/work experience performed in a position approved by the department. Maximum total credit for any one student is 6 hours. Credit/No Credit only.

Anthropology

  
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    AN 122 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

    A survey of world cultures, both past and present. Of particular importance will be an examination of cultural universals and cultural variations throughout the world. The theoretical basis and methods used in cultural anthropology will also be covered throughout the course. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. FA, SP.
  
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    AN 221 - Cultures of the World (3)

    A survey of the cultural and social processes that influence human behavior with comparative examples from different ethnic groups around the world. The course will focus on a comparative analysis of economic, political, religious, and family structures in Africa, the Americas, Oceania, and the Orient. May be repeated for credit, not to exceed course maximum credit of 12 credit hours.
  
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    AN 318 - Women in Other Cultures (3)

    A cross-cultural study of women’s status and roles in selected ethnic or cultural groups in differing stages of development including forager, agrarian, industrial, and post-industrial societies. Even years.
  
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    AN 337 - Family in Other Cultures (3)

    This course is a comparative, cross-cultural study of the family in selected societies. Through a discussion of different family systems, a comparison will be made with the American system.
  
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    AN 364 - Forensic Science (3)

    This course focuses on the use of physical and biological evidence for both legal and humanitarian reasons. The course will explore methods by which forensic scientists, especially forensic anthropologists, search for, recover, and identify evidence from a variety of crime scenes. Topics include the history of forensic science, the physical and biological parameters of evidence, the methods of life history reconstruction of a crime victim, and the ethics of forensic analysis. Recovery methodologies will be addressed through field trips to forensic laboratories and mock excavations. SP, alternate years.

Art + Design

  
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    AR 110 - Exploration of the Visual Arts (3)

    By observing and discussing masterworks as well as engaging in their own creative process to produce an object of self-expression, students gain knowledge and understanding of the visual arts as both a process and a product. Students will visit galleries, and through primary observation of artists’ work and by analysis of what they think they see and their personal responses, gain understanding through discussion as well as research into the artistic, historical, social and cultural context for the work. Through hands-on projects, discussion and critique of these art projects and the students’ own creative process, students will gain insight and perspective about their personal reaction to, and interaction with, the visual arts. Students will gain insight into the role that the arts play in a variety of world cultures, as well as the role art plays in the life of the artist as markmaker and creator. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Transform. FA, SP.
  
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    AR 111 - Beginning Drawing (3)

    Development of traditional drawing skills through observation to aid expressive and pictorial accuracy. Understanding the fundamental language including line, form, light, space, movement, surface, tone, texture, and the personal mark. Basic perspective, still life studies, landscapes, interiors, and the figure may be explored. FA.
  
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    AR 117 - Design Foundations (3)

    Basic visual elements upon which all form, human-made and organic, is based. Function of compositional elements through organization upon a two-dimensional surface, including principles such as pattern, rhythm, repetition, and closure. Understanding of color relationships, the physical properties of pigments, and color perception through a variety of media for artistic application. FA.
  
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    AR 150 - Digital Citizenship (3)

    The course is divided into three sections: Digital/Media Literacy, Active Citizenship, and Community Communication. Digital Citizenship is framed by personal identification and professional commitment to the essential elements of responsible, appropriate behavior with regard to technology use. Students will examine elements of digital citizenship including communication literacy and etiquette. Students will develop skills in becoming responsible, healthy, and self-protective (secure) digital users. All students in the School of Visual and Communication Arts are required to take this course. FA.
  
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    AR 181 - Art of the Ancient World (3)

    This course presents a survey of major artists, artworks, styles, and techniques of art and architecture, from prehistory (Paleolithic) around the world through the Gothic period of the Middle Ages. We study art forms including architecture, sculpture, painting (including fresco, manuscript illumination, mosaic) and decorative arts (including textiles and stained glass), and the role of art and the artist in cultures through the ages. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Acquire. FA.
  
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    AR 183 - From the Renaissance to Modernism (3)

    A survey of major artists, artwork, styles, and techniques, from the Renaissance through the 20th Century with the primary focus on the major Western art movements (including architecture) and the relationship between the social function of art and its form, content, and context. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Acquire. SP.
  
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    AR 212 - Intermediate Drawing (3)

    Emphasis on the figure as subject as well as on still life, landscape, etc. Drawing problems of gesture, movement, rhythm, shape, and volume. Encouragement of experimentation and personal expressive interpretation. Variety of drawing media used. Professional model. Prerequisite: AR 111 . SP
  
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    AR 219 - Three-Dimensional Design (3)

    Fundamental principles of three-dimensional form and their application. Exercises in mass, volume, weight, movement, and light, as well as additive and subtractive techniques, and materials investigation. Prerequisite: AR 117 . FA, even years.
  
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    AR 221 - Beginning Photography (3)

    Introduction to the mechanics of the digital photography process: use of camera and output. Instruction on the basics of design and visual composition as it relates to photography and digital editing. Digital SLR camera required- available for check-out. FA, SP.
  
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    AR 231 - Beginning Ceramics (3)

    Introduction to the process of making utilitarian and sculptural objects with clay. Exploration of forming methods, decorating and glazing techniques, and kiln-loading and firing. Emphasis on the creative process as well as on the development of technical skill and craft.
  
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    AR 245 - Typography I (3)

    Introduction to typography, including type as form, type design, expression and communication, sequence and hierarchy, and type with image. Introduces the fundamentals of typography, its theory, practice, technology, and history. Prerequisites or corequisites: AR 117  and AR 271 . FA
  
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    AR 246 - Graphics I (3)

    Introduction to design and problem solving focused on the generation of visual elements. Exploration of fundamental mark-making principles and techniques within the context of various design formats. Prerequisite or corequisite: AR 117  and AR 271 . FA
  
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    AR 251 - Introduction to Art Therapy (3)

    The historical foundations of the profession of art therapy, including the development of the field and what has influenced its past as well as future directions, and study of managed care, multicultural, ethical, and other current influences. The benefit with various populations and settings in which art therapies work, reinforced with visits from local art therapists. Review of what is required to become a Registered Art Therapist. Prerequisites: PY 101  and PY 201 . FA, even years.
  
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    AR 261 - Beginning Painting (3)

    Introduction to oil painting media and techniques including the basic qualities of paint, grounds, color mixing, and using tools. Elements of composition, color, and form within the context of figure, landscape, and still-life painting. Prerequisite: AR 111 . 3 semester rotation - check with advisor.
  
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    AR 271 - Digital Media: Design Software (3)

    Introduction to industry standard digital tools and techniques for image acquisition, creation and manipulation (i.e. Photoshop, Illustrator, etc.) and page layout and document design (i.e. InDesign) for graphic design purposes. Industry best practices and other issues related to image and page design. Basic layout design concepts, such as eye flow and sequence, composition, and use of type and image. FA, SP.
  
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    AR 280 - Special Topics (1-3)

    Selected topics to be determined by the department.
  
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    AR 322 - Intermediate Photography (3)

    Continued exploration and refinement of silver based and digital methods. Emphasis on in-depth study of selected topics and experimental processes. Prerequisite: AR 221  or permission of instructor. SP.
  
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    AR 345 - Typography II (3)

    The continuation of the study of typography and typographic design, including letterforms, layout and page systems, expression and communication, type as/with image, legibility, and function. Type theory, practice, technology, and history. Emphasis on experimental approach to typographic design and page composition. Prerequisite: AR 245 . SP
  
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    AR 346 - Graphics II (3)

    The development of creative problem-solving techniques, affecting both underlying concept and formal presentation. Encouragement of experimental approach. Generation and use of the image in conjunction with typography. Range of formats. Prerequisite: AR 245 . SP
  
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    AR 351 - Printmaking (3)

    Investigation of techniques for the production of fine prints. Creative development in the areas of relief, intaglio, monoprints, and silkscreen. Emphasis on process. Prerequisite: AR 111 . 3 semester rotation - check with advisor.
  
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    AR 355 - Fiber Design (3)

    Exploration of two and three-dimensional applications of fibers, surface design, and mixed media. Introduction to traditional as well as contemporary techniques. Overview of textile history and criticism with an emphasis on the conceptual development of an artistic work. Prerequisite: AR 117 . FA, odd years.
  
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    AR 365 - Watercolor (3)

    Beginning watercolor techniques, working with color, composition, and formal considerations as well as development of familiarity and skill with watercolor pigments, papers, and brushes. Group discussion and critiques. Prerequisite: AR 111 . 3 semester rotation - check with advisor.
  
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    AR 379 - Digital Media: Design for the Web I (3)

    Introduction to the principles of web design and development including site planning, design, and construction. Projects and lectures will explore web design principles as related to aesthetics, function, user experience, and accessibility. Prerequisite: AR 271 /CO 271 . FA.
  
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    AR 380 - Special Topics (1-3)

    Selected topics to be determined by the department.
  
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    AR 387 - History of Contemporary Art (3)

    Study of the architecture, sculpture, painting, and photography from Impressionism through the present. SP
  
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    AR 390 - Directed Studies (1-3)

    Intermediate studies in a concentration area. Topic of study initiated by the student and presented in writing to the primary concentration instructor and art coordinator for approval prior to registration.
  
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    AR 442 - Design Studio I: Identity (3)

    The analysis, conceptualization, and development of communication systems for businesses and institutions, including symbols, trademarks, logotypes, and branding. Specific focus on socially driven design solutions as developed through the use of human-centered design processes. Projects appropriate for graduation portfolio. Prerequisite: AR 345  and AR 346 . FA
  
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    AR 444 - Design Studio II: Format (3)

    Emphasis on design in a promotional context. Projects will explore design as applied to advertising, brand promotion, and unconventional formats. Utilization of traditional print techniques as well as emerging technologies and digital platforms. Projects appropriate for graduation portfolio. Prerequisites: AR 345  and AR 346 . SP.
  
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    AR 447 - Design Studio III: Publication (3)

    Focus on the manipulation of text and image within both print and e-versions of periodical formats, specifically magazine, newspaper, book, and brochure design. Emphasis on balancing client-oriented practical problem solving with personal style development and self-expression. Oriented toward professional standards and practices. Use of student’s own photography and illustration encouraged. Projects appropriate for graduation portfolio. Prerequisite: AR 345  and AR 346 . FA
  
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    AR 459 - Art as Therapy (3)

    Exploration of techniques of art useful for facilitating self-expression and communication. Demonstration of how art promotes both personal and group understanding. Investigation of symbolic meaning in art and understanding of how art can lead to behavior change and self-understanding. Useful for artists and classroom teachers, as well as for therapists who work with groups of children or adults. Meets the Capstone course requirement for the Art Therapy concentration. Prerequisites: PY 101  and PY 210 . FA, odd years.
  
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    AR 471 - Digital Media: Design for the Web II (3)

    Continuation of contemporary web design techniques with a focus on responsive design for user centered digital environments. Projects and lectures will explore various web tools and conceptualization skills as related to progressive site design and development. Prerequisite: AR 379 . SP.
  
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    AR 480 - Special Topics (1-3)

    Selected topics to be determined by the department.
  
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    AR 490 - Directed Studies (1-6)

    Advanced studies in a concentration area. Topic of study initiated by the student and presented in writing to the primary concentration instructor and Art + Design chair for approval prior to registration. Open to students only in their last two semesters.
  
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    AR 495 - Internship (1-6)

    Student seeks art-related position and presents proposal in writing for approval by primary concentration instructor and Art + Design chair prior to registration. Prerequisites: junior standing. FA, SP, SU.
  
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    AR 497 - Portfolio Preparation (3)

    Preparation of a graphic design portfolio, resumé, and business letterhead. Resumé and cover letter writing and interviewing workshops. Culminates in professional portfolio review. With AR 498 , meets Capstone for Graphic Design majors. Corequisite: AR 447 . FA.
  
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    AR 498 - Senior Studio (3)

    Design projects for freelance clients and on-campus clients, working individually and as teams. Students meet directly with clients and vendors, preparing job parameters, job flow, budgets, estimates and time-lines. With AR 497 , meets Capstone requirement for Graphic Design majors. Prerequisites: AR 447 . 2015 CORE: Community Engagement. SP.

Biology

  
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    BI 111 - General Biology: Cells & Genes (4)

    A survey of cell theory (cellular structure and function) and molecular genetics that illustrates the nature and limits of science and two of the fundamental concepts of the life sciences. Elements of evolutionary theory will be discussed throughout the course and examples from all kingdoms of life will be used. Laboratory will introduce students to methods of microscopy, modeling, and experimental design and analysis. This course will identify key theories of science, including contributions and limitations of scientific discovery. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory per week. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Explorations of Nature, Acquire. FA, SP.
  
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    BI 112 - General Biology: Ecology & Evolution (4)

    This course provides an overview of the nature of science and scientific inquiry as they pertain to biology. Although all fundamental theories that form the foundation of modern biology are discussed, those that pertain directly to ecology and evolution are emphasized. The laboratory component includes a survey of life (diversity of organisms) and a collaborative investigation that introduces students to the methods of experimental design, data analysis, and communication of scientific information. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory per week. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Explorations of Nature, Acquire. FA, SP.
  
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    BI 215 - Humans & the Environment (3)

    A survey of the environmental sciences that addresses human impacts on the global environment. Students build a strong foundation in ecology. They then apply ecological concepts to contemporary challenges such as human population growth, biodiversity conservation, resource management, food security, climate change, energy efficiency, and renewable energy. The interface between science and other disciplines (e.g., economics, history, ethics) in making policy and management decisions is a central theme of the course. Students consider the importance of advocacy, community leadership, multi-disciplinarity, and cross-cultural communication for establishing a more sustainable society. The laboratory introduces students to methods of experimental design and quantitative analysis. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Belief & Reason, Transform, Global Studies. FA.
  
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    BI 220 - Human Anatomy & Physiology (6-8)

    A detailed study of the microscopic and gross human body structure and function taught from a systems perspective. The eight-credit option, available only with permission from the student’s advisor and the course instructor, entails additional assignments and/or weekly class meetings. The eight-credit option may be required for some pre-health profession students (e.g., pre-dental, pre-physical therapy, pre-occupational therapy). 4 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BI 111  or BI 112 . FA, SP.
  
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    BI 250 - General Microbiology (4)

    Morphology, physiology, and growth of microorganisms; beneficial and harmful relationships between microorganisms and people are examined; techniques of isolation, cultivation, and characterization are used in the laboratory. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BI 111  or BI 112 . FA, SP.
  
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    BI 310 - Evolution (3)

    A descriptive overview examining theories regarding processes by which life forms evolve, chemical evolution and origins of life, organismal evolution, and population genetics and dynamics. 3 hours lecture per week. Prerequisites: BI 111  or BI 112 .
  
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    BI 311 - Animal Form, Function, & Development (3)

    An examination of the embryonic and lifespan processes of selected members of the animal kingdom. 3 hours lecture with integrated laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: BI 111  or BI 112 . SP, even years.
  
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    BI 313 - Plant Form & Function (3)

    An examination of the development and physiology of members of the plant kingdom. 3 hours lecture with integrated laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: BI 111 , BI 112  or permission of instructor. SP, odd years.
  
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    BI 318 - Genetics (3)

    Principles of hereditary nature, transmission, and function of genetic material and genetics of populations are studied. 3 hours of lecture with integrated laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: BI 111  or permission of instructor. SP, even years.
  
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    BI 321 - Immunology (3)

    A survey that examines antigens, antibodies, couplement, and humoral and cell-mediated immunities; immediate hypersensitivities; immune deficiencies; and autoimmune diseases. 3 hours lecture with integrated laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: BI 111  or permission of instructor.
  
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    BI 325 - Pathophysiology (3)

    A study of alterations of normal human physiology that are considered pathological. 3 hours lecture per week. Prerequisite: BI 220 . SP, SU.
  
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    BI 331 - Vertebrate Anatomy (4)

    An investigation of the body structure of representative vertebrates. Topics include a survey of vertebrate evolution and systematics, histology, and the relationships between structure and function. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BI 111  or BI 112 .
  
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    BI 341 - Animal Physiology (3)

    An investigation into the principles underlying animal function. 3 hours lecture per week. Prerequisites: BI 111  or BI 112 .
  
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    BI 342 - Biochemistry I (3)

    Introduction to the chemistry of life processes. The chemistry of amino acids, proteins, and carbohydrates is examined and applied to biosynthesis and catabolism of carbohydrates through glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the citric acid cycle, and electron transport. 3 hours lecture per week. Prerequisites: BI 111  and CH 216 . FA, SP.
  
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    BI 345 - Molecular Cell Biology (4)

    Structure, function, and biochemistry at the cellular and subcellular level, including the biosynthesis and catabolism of fats. Also considered are the chemistry, replication, and transcription of nucleic acids and some topics dealing with recombinant DNA. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BI 111  and CH 216 . SP, odd years.
  
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    BI 351 - Introduction to Animal Behavior (3)

    A broad survey of animal behavior from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. A hypothesis-testing approach to understanding animal behavior will be emphasized. Specific topics will include predator-prey interactions, group living, fighting and assessment, sexual selection, parental care, cooperation, and altruism. Examples will be drawn from a wide range of taxa, including insects, birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians. 3 hours lecture per week with integrated laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: BI 112  or permission of instructor.
  
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    BI 360 - Ecology (3)

    A study of relationships between organisms and their environments that involves some fieldwork. 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: BI 111 , BI 112  or permission of instructor.
  
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    BI 361 - Ecology Laboratory (2)

    A series of field and laboratory-based exercises designed to address ecological questions. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BI 360 .
  
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    BI 363 - Conservation Biology (3)

    An overview of the principles that govern population biology, economic and ethical values of biodiversity, threats to biodiversity, conservation of populations, species and ecosystems, practical applications of conservation biology, and integration of a conservation ethic in human societies. Prerequisite: BI 112 
  
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    BI 380 - Special Topics (1-4)

    Selected topics courses determined at the discretion of the department. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Intermittently.
  
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    BI 391 - Real World Biology (1)

    A weekly discussion of specific topics and career opportunities for students about to receive a bachelor’s degree in biology. Meets the Communication Intensive course requirement in the major. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor. SP.
  
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    BI 392 - Introduction to Research (3)

    This course reviews the fundamentals of science as a process, a career path, and a social institution. Using a case study approach, students evaluate the substance and process of science, including ethical considerations such as diversity in the sciences, barriers to participation, and how scientific questions are identified as worthy of pursuit and funding. Students also develop skills relevant to the discipline, such as reading and understanding primary literature, writing research proposals, and designing and implementing a scientific experiment. The course introduces students to the wide range of career options available to biology majors. An underlying theme of the course is the importance of the biological sciences in serving the broader community. Prerequisites: BI 111  and CH 131 . Corequisite: BI 112 . 2015 CORE: Explorations of Nature, Contribute, Community Engagement. FA.
  
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    BI 492 - Biology Literature Research (1)

    Students perform a directed study of a selected topic in biology and complete a library researched review article. Restricted to majors in biology and prehealth professions. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. Corequisite: BI 392 . FA, SP.
  
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    BI 493 - Biology Laboratory Research (1-6)

    Students perform and report on an individual student research project in the laboratory or field. Required for graduation with honors in biology. Students may count up to 2 hours in research per semester toward major requirements. Prerequisite: BI 392  or permission of department. FA, SP, SU.
  
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    BI 495 - Internship (1-2)

    A carefully monitored work or service experience, occurring off-campus at an institution or agency specializing in an area relevant to the student’s ultimate career goals. The student will meet the intended learning outcomes for the experience. Students will be notified of their eligibility by the Research and Internship Coordinator.
  
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    BI 499 - Colloquium & Seminar (2-3)

    Students share their experiences from BI 492 , BI 493 , or BI 495  in written and oral form. This course fulfills the Capstone requirement in the major. Prerequisite: BI 492  or BI 493  or BI 495 . FA, SP.

Business Law

  
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    BL 305 - Legal Aspects of Business I (3)

    The study of legal issues inherent to business operations such as contracts, torts, and crimes; the web of legal, social, political, and economic systems that business operates in locally, nationally, and internationally; and the frameworks available to assist business in legal problem-solving and ethical decision-making. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Belief & Reason, Acquire. FA, SP.
  
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    BL 345 - Legal Aspects of Business II (3)

    A continuation of Legal Aspects of Business I. Topics include: secured transactions, negotiable instruments, agency, mortgages, creditor law and liens, anti-trust, insurance, international business law, administrative law, and constitutional law. Prerequisite: BL 305 . SP.
  
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    BL 346 - Employment Law (3)

    The study of state and federal statutory and case law that govern the employee/employer relationship. Prerequisite: BL 305 . FA, odd years.
  
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    BL 347 - International Business Law (3)

    A study of the principles, laws, and organizations that impact the management of an international business transaction. The course will cover the law of international trade, licensing, and investment and explore the roles played by legal, financial, accounting, and management professionals in international business transactions. Prerequisite: BL 305 .

Business

  
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    BU 230 - Personal Financial Management (3)

    This course is to provide students with the tools and techniques to enhance the decision-making process regarding personal financial management. The course will cover such topics as cash management, credit and budgeting, investments, taxes, insurance, and financial planning. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. FA.
  
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    BU 305 - Legal Aspects of Business I (3)

    The study of legal issues inherent to business operations such as contracts, torts, and crimes; the web of legal, social, political, and economic systems that business operates in locally, nationally, and internationally; and the frameworks available to assist business in legal problem-solving and ethical decision-making. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Belief & Reason, Acquire. FA, SP.
  
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    BU 310 - Marketing (3)

    Introduction to the principles and practices of marketing goods and services. Strategy and planning are emphasized as well as a thorough treatment of product, pricing, physical distribution, and promotional issues. The marketing concept is given extensive treatment. Prerequisite: EC 202  with a grade of “C” or better. FA, SP.
  
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    BU 312 - Consumer Behavior (3)

    Analysis of internal factors influencing consumer behavior and identification of variables basic to the segmentation of consumer markets. Prerequisites: BU 310  and PY 101 . SP.
  
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    BU 321 - Management (3)

    Principles of management applicable to any organization including functions, processes, and behavior concepts. FA, SP.
  
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    BU 322 - Organizational Behavior & Development (3)

    The study of the structure, individual and group behavior, and development of organizations. Prerequisites: EN 111  and CO 110 .  FA, SP.
  
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    BU 323 - Human Resources Management (3)

    Study of human resource management as an integral function of an organization. Areas emphasized are employee influence and human resource flow. Prerequisite: BU 321  or BU 322 . FA.
  
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    BU 325 - Labor-Management Relations (3)

    Basic labor-management relations history, development, and applications. Prerequisite: BU 321  or BU 322 .
  
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    BU 330 - Finance (3)

    Study of financing organizations with an emphasis on corporations. Prerequisites: AC 202 , EC 202 , EC 240  and MA 115  or MA 120 . 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Transform. FA, SP, SU.
  
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    BU 331 - Investments (3)

    Analysis and evaluation of the major types of financial investments. Prerequisite: BU 330 . SP.
  
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    BU 340 - Business Communications (3)

    The exploration of how internal and external business communications can be more effective. Students develop and create written and performance communication projects that serve the needs of profit or not-for-profit business in a multi-cultural market and articulate and critically examine their creative process and the effectiveness of the communication. Prerequisites: EN 112  with a grade of “C” or better and CO 110 . 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Transform. FA, SP.
 

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