Apr 09, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Course Numbering System

001-099 Developmental Courses (Credit Type DV*)
100-299 Lower division courses; may have prerequisites
300-499 Upper division courses
500-599 Foundational graduate courses and Education graduate certification courses
600-699 Graduate courses

*DV - Developmental courses completed at Avila count toward Term hours, Term GPA and Career GPA, but are not counted in Career hours. Developmental courses completed at another institution are counted in Term hours and Term GPA, but are not counted in Career hours or Career GPA.

Catalog Course Information

The number in parentheses after the course title indicates the credit in semester hours.

The letters following the course description indicate the semester in which the course is given. Fall semester course offerings are indicated by FA; spring semester, SP; summer session, SU. Where frequency of course offering is not indicated, the course is given as required.

 

ESL Studies

  
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    EL 055 - Academic Skills I (2)

    This two credit hour course provides students with a foundation in academic skills necessary for success in an American university. Skills focused on include various methods and techniques regarding reading, writing, note-taking, critical thinking, and additional study skills. ILCP students only. SU.
  
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    EL 056 - Academic Skills II (2)

    This two credit hour course provides students with advanced academic skills necessary for success in an American university. Skills focused on include various methods of reading, writing, note-taking, critical thinking, and additional study skills. ILCP students only. SU.
  
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    EL 061 - Speaking & Listening I (3)

    This course provides students with a foundation in speaking and listening. The course focuses on academic skills which include speaking and listening practice, vocabulary usage, and pair and group work. ILCP students only. Prerequisite: Testing to determine appropriate placement level.  FA, SP.
  
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    EL 062 - Speaking & Listening II (3)

    This course provides students with intermediate English speaking and listening practice. The course focuses on academic skills which include vocabulary practice, note-taking skills, pair and group work, and oral presentations. ILCP students only. Prerequisite: EL 061  or testing to determine appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 063 - Speaking & Listening III (3)

    This course provides students with high intermediate/advanced English speaking and listening practice. The course focuses on academic skills which include vocabulary practice, note-taking skills, pair and group work, and oral presentations. ILCP students only. Prerequisite: EL 062  or testing to determine appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 071 - Reading & Vocabulary I (3)

    This course provides students with a basic foundation in vocabulary development, comprehension skills, and basic reading study skills. Additional reading practice is facilitated through the use of a reader. ILCP students only. Prerequisite: Testing to determine appropriate placement level.  FA, SP.
  
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    EL 072 - Reading & Vocabulary II (3)

    This course provides students with practice in vocabulary development, comprehension skills, and reading study skills at the intermediate level. Additional reading practice is facilitated through the use of readers. ILCP students only. Prerequisite: EL 071  or testing to determine appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 073 - Reading & Vocabulary III (3)

    This course provides students with practice in vocabulary development, comprehension skills, and reading study skills at the high intermediate/advanced level. Additional reading practice is facilitated through the use of readers. ILCP students only. Prerequisite: EL 072  or testing to determine appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 081 - Grammar I (3)

    This course provides students with a basic foundation in English grammar. Students focus on both the rules and the proper usage of specific grammar points. Grammar practice consists of both written and oral assignments. ILCP students only. Prerequisite: Testing to determine appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 082 - Grammar II (3)

    This course provides students with an intermediate level knowledge of English grammar. Students focus on both the rules and the proper usage of specific grammar points. Grammar practice consists of both written and oral assignments. ILCP students only. Prerequisite: Successful completion of EL 081  or testing to determine appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 083 - Grammar III (3)

    This course provides students with a high intermediate/advanced level knowledge of English grammar. Students focus on both the rules and the proper usage of specific grammar points. Grammar practice consists of both written and oral assignments. ILCP students only. Prerequisite: Successful completion of EL 082  or testing to determine appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 091 - Writing I (3)

    This course provides students with a basic foundation in English writing. Students apply the writing process first in sentence form and then progress to paragraph writing. Appropriate content, organization, and grammatical structure are emphasized within various rhetorical modes. ILCP students only. Prerequisite: testing to determine appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 092 - Writing II (3)

    This course provides students with intermediate level English writing practice. Students apply the writing process first in paragraph form and then progress to essay writing. Appropriate content, organization, and grammatical structure are emphasized within various rhetorical modes. ILCP students only. Prerequisite: Successful completion of EL 091  or testing to determine appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 093 - Writing III (3)

    This course provides students with high intermediate/advanced level English writing practice. Students apply the writing process in compositions and essays in addition to learning proper citation methods. Appropriate content, organization, and grammatical structure are emphasized within various rhetorical modes.  ILCP students only. Prerequisite: Successful completion of EL 092  or testing to determine appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 164 - Speaking & Listening IV (3)

    This course provides the student with advanced English speaking and listening practice. The course focuses on the skills needed in an academic setting and will include vocabulary practice, development of fluency, pronunciation practice, notetaking skills for various subjects, pair and group work, and extended oral presentations. This course carries academic credit for ILCP students only. Prerequisite: EL 063  or appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 174 - Reading & Vocabulary IV (3)

    This course provides the student with an advanced foundation in vocabulary development, comprehension skills, and reading studying skills. Additional reading practice is facilitated through the use of academic readers. This course carries academic credit for ILCP students only. Prerequisite: EL 073  or appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 180 - Special Topics (3)

    This course will offer a series of intensive classes on topics dealing with relevant issues. This class may utilize outside experts as instructors along with current faculty. It provides an opportunity for students to choose topics of particular interest. This course carries academic credit for ILCP students only. FA, SP, SU.
  
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    EL 184 - Grammar IV (3)

    This course provides the student with advanced level knowledge of English grammar. Students focus on both the rules and the proper usage of specific grammar points. Grammar practice will consist of both written and oral assignments. This course carries academic credit for ILCP students only. Prerequisite: EL 083  or appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 194 - Writing IV (3)

    This course provides the student with advanced level English writing practice. Students will apply the writing process in compositions and various categories of academic essays, learn proper citation methods, and focus on the researched essay and a bibliography. Appropriate content, organization, and grammatical structure will be emphasized. This course carries academic credit for ILCP students only. Prerequisite: EL 093  or appropriate placement level. FA, SP.
  
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    EL 280 - Special Topics (3)

    Special topics courses will focus on important issues in the field and explore the issues from critical perspectives. These classes will utilize outside experts as instructors as well as full-time faculty. They will provide opportunities for students to choose topics of particular interest and investigate them further. This course carries academic credit for ILCP students only. FA, SP, SU.
  
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    EL 380 - Special Topics (3)

    Special topics courses will focus on important issues in the field and explore the issues from critical perspectives. These classes will utilize outside experts as instructors as well as full-time faculty. They will provide opportunities for students to choose topics of particular interest and investigate them further. This course carries academic credit for ILCP students only. FA, SP, SU.
  
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    EL 480 - Special Topics (3)

    Special topics courses will focus on important issues in the field and explore the issues from critical perspectives. These classes will utilize outside experts as instructors as well as full-time faculty. They will provide opportunities for students to choose topics of particular interest and investigate them further. This course carries academic credit for ILCP students only. FA, SP, SU.

English

  
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    EN 095 - Writing Strategies (3)

    Intensive review of grammar, correct usage, sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, and spelling, along with vocabulary development and essay structure. Written assignments discussed individually. Does not satisfy core requirement or count toward degree program. FA, SP.
  
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    EN 111 - Composition I: Rhetorical Discourse (3)

    Extensive practice in expository writing with emphasis on organization and methods of paragraph and essay development. Introduction to research writing. Practice in correct grammar and usage, punctuation, and spelling stressed as necessary for clear, effective written communication. This is a foundations course. Prerequisite: EN 095  with a grade of “C” or better or appropriate placement exam scores. PRE-2015 CORE: Level I. FA, SP.
  
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    EN 112 - Composition II: Rhetorical Argument (3)

    Continued practice in expository writing with emphasis on longer, well-developed essays. Stresses analytical thinking and development of a mature writing style. Grammar, usage, punctuation, and spelling reviewed as needed.  A research paper is required. This is a foundations course. Prerequisite: EN 111  with a “C” or better. PRE-2015 CORE: Level I. 2015 CORE: Belief & Reason, Acquire. FA, SP.
  
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    EN 210 - Composing for the 21st Century (3)

    This course develops writing techniques applied to diverse rhetorical situations exterior to the university. Students investigate and practice non-academic composition focused on community involvement and their anticipated career. The course includes practice in writing, speaking, and digital literacy. Prerequisite: EN 111  or EN 112 . 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Transform. SP.
  
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    EN 213 - Advanced Composition (3)

    This course is designed to expand student understanding and repertoire of stylistic moves and to enable them to write finely crafted, rhetorically sensitive prose. The course also introduces students to modern language theories, which posit that language is inherently ideological. Student will analyze the role of style in persuasion and try to strategically employ elements of style in their own arguments. Prerequisite: EN 112 . 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Transform. SP, even years.
  
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    EN 231 - Poetry Writing (3)

    In this course, students will write their own poetry while being introduced to a number of respected and well-known poets. Students will write a group of poems that will have been critiqued and edited in class. At the conclusion of the course, students will have learned the many elements and terminology of Poetry. Prerequisite: EN 111  or EN 112 . 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Transform. Every third semester.
  
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    EN 233 - Fiction Writing (3)

    Techniques of writing fiction. Topics include language, point of view, characterization, plotting, dialogue, and description. In-class analysis of student work. Prerequisite: EN 111  or EN 112 . Every third semester.
  
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    EN 235 - Playwriting (3)

    Basic techniques of writing for the stage. Prerequisite: EN 111  or EN 112 . Every third semester.
  
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    EN 271 - African-American Literature (3)

    This course will expose students to African American authors from the 19th Century to the 21st Century. The various notable authors range from Frederick Douglass to Toni Morrison. In this course, students will be introduced to many significant authors’ issues and their craft. By the end of the course, students will have an understanding of what it means and has meant to be an African American author writing in a society that has historically been hostile to them. Prerequisite: EN 111  or EN 112 . PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Acquire. FA, SP.
  
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    EN 275 - Gender & Literature (3)

    This course explores the expression of gender as it appears in selected literature from the 19th Century to the 21st Century. In this class, we will explore Western heteronormative masculinity and femininity as well as alternative gender expression. Among the secondary focuses evaluated in this course are issues of power, authority, social representation, and social change as they relate to gender issues. Prerequisite: EN 111  or EN 112 . PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Transform, Global Studies. FA, SP.
  
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    EN 278 - Global Literary Perspectives (3)

    Through the lens of literature, this course explores the flows of people and their culture and labor across borders. Each text is examined in terms of its artistic and political dimensions with a focus on identity, gender politics, and historical revision. Rather than discrete nations and single cultures, the course concentrates on movement, hybridity, and multiplicity. In addition to physical movement, the course examines other possessions that move across the borders including information, language, traditions, and beliefs, examining ways in which people remember, reimagine, and reshape their sense of self and community. Prerequisite: EN 111  or EN 112 . PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Acquire, Global Studies. FA, SP.
  
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    EN 279 - Research Methods & Technology (3)

    An in-depth study of the English research methodologies which will prepare students for more advanced courses in the field of English literature or rhetoric. A focus will be on using computer programs and digital databases. Will fulfill the University Functional Computer Literacy requirement in the major. Prerequisite: EN 112 . FA, even years.
  
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    EN 350 - Rhetorical Theory (3)

    This course will examine the shape of rhetorical theory in general as well as study contributions of specific modern rhetorical theorists. Students will apply theory to rhetorical texts, including nonfiction, speeches, fiction, and digital or otherwise multimodal productions. Prerequisite: EN 111  or EN 112 . Creativity & Culture, Contribute. FA, odd years.
  
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    EN 361 - Literacy Studies (3)

    An examination of the development of the English language and historical and current discussions around the uses of literacy in culture. Includes the study of digital literacy, grammatical principles, and an examination of the relationship between literacy and social, economic, and political development. This course approaches the idea of literacy as embedded within society, whose social institutions and conditions shape how literacies are practiced and assigned cultural value. Prerequisite: EN 112 . SP, odd years.
  
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    EN 377 - Adolescent Literature (3)

    Study of adolescent literature, how to analyze and engage students, and ways to incorporate literature and promote reader-response in middle school and secondary classrooms. Primarily for middle school and secondary English education candidates, but open to all education students. Prerequisite: one lower level literature course. FA, even years.
  
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    EN 380 - Special Topics in English (1-3)

    Selected topics to be determined by the department. Prerequisite: One EN course 200 level or above.
  
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    EN 443 - Advanced Creative Writing Workshop (3)

    The workshop is an essential component of the English major. Students immerse themselves in the imaginative process of creating literature and completing a manuscript of poetry, a play, or a novella. The course provides critiques that are intense and technical. Students prepare portfolios of their creative writing and present their work before peers and faculty. Prerequisite: One 200 level writing course. Intermittently.
  
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    EN 449 - Introduction to Literary Criticism & Theory (3)

    Through a survey of literary criticism and theory, this course enhances students’ understanding of the discipline of literary studies. Students will engage with specific literary works through a wide range of theoretical and analytical approaches such as formalism, feminism, Marxism, New Historicism, cultural studies, and poststructuralism. Students will learn to identify formal schools of theory and criticism, to create their own critical approaches to literature, and to respond to the criticism of others.  Prerequisite: One lower level literature course. SP, odd years.
  
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    EN 451 - Examining Genre (3)

    In this course, students will read diverse works that represent a literary genre, including poetry, prose, drama, novel, and short form works. By examining and interpreting these works, they will learn the significance of the literary genre, where it came from, who shaped it, and what role it plays in shaping culture. Prerequisite: One 200-level English course. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Contribute. FA, even years.
  
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    EN 453 - Interpreting Period (3)

    In this course, students will read diverse works that represent a literary period, learning the significance of the period, where it came from, who shaped it, and what legacy it left. They will learn the shape of literary aesthetics for this period, what arguments authors were having about literary composition and reception, and how these played out in critical and popular reception of literature. Prerequisite: One lower-level literature course. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Contribute. SP.
  
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    EN 455 - Exploring Authorship (3)

    This course will look at literature through the lens of authorship, or how a particular author or set of authors shape their compositions. Prerequisite: One lower-level literature course. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Contribute. FA, odd years.
  
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    EN 457 - Investigating Locale (3)

    This course will look at literature through the lens of locale, or a specific area that influenced the composition of several authors. Prerequisite: One lower-level literature course. SP, odd years.
  
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    EN 462 - Rhetoric of Women (3)

    Using gender as a category of rhetorical study, this course locates and listens to rhetoric by and about women. Students will study diverse rhetoric produced by women as well as general feminist rhetorics. Prerequisite: EN 213 , EN 279 , or EN 350 . SP, even years.
  
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    EN 464 - Rhetorical Epochs (3)

    This course concentrates on the rhetoric of a particular epoch. The emphasis will be on the theory, practice, and implications of rhetoric in the time period being studied, while also situating it within the continuum of rhetorical history. Students will act as both a rhetor and a rhetorician. Possible epochs of study include Ancient, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Modern rhetoric. Prerequisite: EN 213 , EN 279 , or EN 350 . FA, even years.
  
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    EN 466 - Red Hot Rhetoric (3)

    This course engages the rhetoric around contemporary social issues. The emphasis will be on questions contested in the public sphere and will involve in-depth examinations of power and voice within competing American ideologies. Possible topics include the rhetoric of politics, the environment, war, and race. Prerequisite: EN 111  and one English course 200- level or higher.  2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Contribute. FA, odd years.
  
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    EN 480 - Special Topics (1-3)

    Selected topics to be determined by the department. Prerequisite: Two EN courses 200 level or above.
  
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    EN 490 - Directed Studies (1-3)

    Under faculty supervision, an advanced study project will be pursued in the area of choice. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
  
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    EN 499 - Senior Seminar (3)

    Senior Seminar students undertake an extended research project on a topic of their choice, write a research paper, and present their paper at the senior colloquium. This course meets the Capstone requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. FA.

Finance

  
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    FI 330 - Finance (3)

    An introduction to important topics in finance with an emphasis on corporations. Topics include: time value of money, bond valuation, equity valuation, analysis of risk and returns, capital budgeting decision models, capital structure, cost of capital, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisites: AC 201  with a grade of “C” or better and EC 240  with a grade of “C” or better. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Transform. FA, SP.
  
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    FI 331 - Investments (3)

    A study of investment theories and practice. Topics include: major asset classes and financial instruments, the security markets, portfolio theory, bond prices and yields, bond portfolio management, security analysis and equity valuation, and portfolio performance evaluation. Prerequisite: FI 330 . SP.
  
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    FI 432 - Derivatives (3)

    A study of the major types of derivative contracts, their uses, and valuation. Prerequisites: FI 330 . FA, even years.
  
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    FI 435 - Financial Policy (3)

    Case studies of the theories and practice of financial management including financial statement and cash flow analysis, financial forecasting, estimation of weighted average cost of capital, capital budgeting decision models, and capital structure analysis. Prerequisite: FI 330 . FA.
  
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    FI 437 - International Finance (3)

    A survey of major issues in international financial management. Major topics covered include: introduction to international financial markets, exchange rate determination, currency derivatives, international arbitrate and interest rate parity, purchasing power parity, exchange rate forecasting, measuring exchange rate risk, and exchange rate risk management. Prerequisite: FI 330 . 2015 CORE: Global Studies.

Foreign Language

  
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    FL 111 - Foreign Language I (3)

    Study of the grammar and vocabulary, aural comprehension, oral ability, and the reading and writing of a foreign language. For beginning students.
  
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    FL 112 - Foreign Language II (3)

    Continued study of the grammar and vocabulary, and development of aural comprehension, oral ability, and the reading and writing of a foreign language. Prerequisite: FL 111 .
  
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    FL 380 - Special Topics (1-3)

    Study of the grammar and vocabulary, aural comprehension, oral ability, and the reading and writing of a foreign language.
  
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    FL 490 - Directed Studies (1-3)

    Advanced studies of a language.

Foundation Studies

  
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    FS 101 - First-Year Seminar (1)

    The goals of this course are to introduce students to the academic and social knowledge, skills, and resources within the Avila community and to encourage students’ personal development through an exploration of personal values, Avila’s mission, and global issues. Course goals will be achieved through readings, written analysis, and discussions. This is a foundations course. FA.

Geography

  
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    GG 101 - World Geography (3)

    An introductory survey of the major geographical regions of the world. Emphasis on the interaction between humans and their environment and on the contrasts between developed and less developed regions. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Acquire, Global Studies. FA, SP.

Healthcare Management

  
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    HC 305 - Healthcare Policy, U.S. & Global (3)

    This course provides an introduction to and discussion of contemporary issues regarding healthcare services in the U.S. compared to other developed countries. It examines and describes ethical, political, social, technological, economic, and cultural issues including various options or choices facing U.S. healthcare. This includes an examination of recent health reform legislation and the potential outcomes and consequences. RN to BSN students must have advisor approval.
  
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    HC 310 - Healthcare for the Elderly (3)

    This course is designed to examine the services, clients, and caregivers comprising the continuum of long-term care. It describes the evolution of the concept, its current organization, and the basic financing sources enabling its operation. An introductory course, it focuses on practical issues facing healthcare managers and also highlights the experience of informal caregivers who play an essential role in the continuum. Major regulatory bodies are identified as voluntary, federal, and state agencies that attempt to ensure quality of care. A personal touch on the subject is gained by students through caregiver/client interviews and site visits to continuum service centers. RN to BSN students must have advisor approval. Prerequisite: HC 305 /NU 305 .
  
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    HC 320 - Managed Healthcare (3)

    Introduction to the concepts and principles involved in the Managed Healthcare industry. The course will provide practical knowledge about the structure and functions of Managed Healthcare in addition to raising ethical, social, economic, and political questions regarding the management and distribution of Managed Healthcare services. Prerequisite: HC 305 /NU 305 .
  
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    HC 330 - Organization of Healthcare Services (3)

    This course will provide insightful examination into the complexities of both the organization and financing of healthcare through the context of systematic operations. This course will cover healthcare finance, fiscal operations, financial reporting and measures, comparative data, evaluating budgets, plan financial models, and strategic healthcare financing. RN to BSN students must have advisor approval. Prerequisite: HC 305 /NU 305 .
  
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    HC 335 - Healthcare Planning & Marketing (3)

    This course is designed to introduce the student to the vital roles strategic planning and marketing share in today’s healthcare field. These functions are presented as essential tools for organizational survival in an era where reform and change are sweeping the healthcare industry. Prerequisite: HC 305  / NU 305 .
  
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    HC 340 - Legal Aspects of Healthcare (3)

    This course will focus on many of the key laws and the legal process that affect healthcare providers and organizations. The course will provide the students with a fundamental understanding of many of the significant laws, regulations, and policies to which healthcare entities are subjected, the purpose for their enactment, and the process for administering and enforcing these rules in the healthcare industry. RN to BSN students must have advisor approval.
  
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    HC 456 - Healthcare Informatics (2-3)

    This nursing theory course examines and applies concepts related to the professional nurse’s role in healthcare informatics. This web-enhanced course meets the computer proficiency requirement for nursing majors. Pre-licensure prerequisite: Admission to the nursing major. RN to BSN students must have advisor approval. FA.
  
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    HC 499 - Strategic Management for Healthcare Managers (3)

    This course is designed to synthesize previous studies in healthcare management while bringing students to the foreground of their role as healthcare managers. The course serves as a culminating experience in which students are expected to apply knowledge gained from their undergraduate experience. The course is designed to provide a final experience in which students demonstrate mastery of content and allow an opportunity for closure and connection between courses. The purpose of this capstone course is to facilitate the integration and synthesis of content through critical thinking. Meets the Capstone requirement in the major. Prerequisites: Four HC courses including HC 335 .

Health

  
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    HE 101 - Introduction to Healthcare Careers (3)

    This introductory course will provide the student interested in a healthcare career an opportunity to explore a variety of career options and understand how healthcare professionals work together to meet health outcomes. Information will be shared about the characteristics of various health careers including necessary academic preparation, job responsibilities, employment potential, and salary ranges. In addition, students will learn about current issues and trends in healthcare. 2015 CORE: Community Engagement. FA.
  
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    HE 103 - Introductory Strength Training (2)

    This course is designed to provide students with the basic skills, techniques, and programs to develop and maintain a lifelong strength training program. The basic objectives of the course are in alignment with a lifelong fitness/wellness program. FA, SP.
  
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    HE 104 - Introduction to T’ai Chi Ch’uan (2)

    This course is designed to introduce students to the principles of T’ai Chi Ch’uan, a meditative form of physical exercise and mental discipline that, if practiced daily, enhances health and wellbeing. FA, SP.
  
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    HE 111 - Nutrition (3)

    This course will address nutrients, their functions, and factors affecting their utilization, food sources, and dietary requirements. Nutrition recommendations in all phases of the life cycle and consumer/nutrition related topics will be addressed. This course is web-supported. 2015 CORE: Explorations of Nature, Acquire. FA, SP.
  
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    HE 124 - Medical Terminology (2)

    A study of the terminology of diseases, operative reports, pathology, surgical instruments, diagnostic tests, drug groups, and abbreviations with emphasis on word analysis and definitions. 2 hours lecture per week. SP.

History

  
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    HI 201 - Ancient History & Culture (3)

    Using culture (i.e., the arts) as the central category of historical analysis, this course is a global history of human experience from ca. 3500 BCE to 1450 CE. In each major unit of the course, students will analyze cultural artifacts to excavate the significance of culture (i.e., the arts) as a reflection of and reaction to the development of power relations (i.e., political, economic, social, or gender hierarchies) and the impact of transnational forces (i.e., global networks of trade, war, ideas, or human migration) in diverse cultures and societies over time in world history. Meets the lower-division requirement for World History in the major. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Acquire, Global Studies.
  
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    HI 202 - Modern History & Culture (3)

    Using culture (i.e., the arts) as the central category of historical analysis, this course is a global history of human experience from ca.1450 CE to the present. In each major unit of the course, students will analyze cultural artifacts to excavate the significance of culture (i.e., the arts) as a reflection of and reaction to the development of power relations (i.e., political, economic, social, or gender hierarchies) and the impact of transnational forces (i.e., global networks of trade, war, ideas, or human migration) in diverse cultures and societies over time in world history. Meets the lower-division requirement for World History in the major. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Acquire, Global Studies.
  
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    HI 203 - American Experience I (3)

    This course is a survey of American social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the first European settlements to 1865, with emphasis on the experiences of Native Americans, colonization, independence, nation building, reform, and slavery. Meets the lower-division requirement for American History in the history major. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Acquire.
  
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    HI 204 - American Experience II (3)

    This course is a survey of major political, social, cultural, and economic changes in United States history from 1865 to the present, with emphasis on the development of industrial society, consumerism, the expanding role of the United States in world affairs, as well as civil rights and other social movements. Meets the lower-division requirement for American History in the history major. PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Acquire.
  
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    HI 280 - Topics in History (1-3)

    This course is a survey of specific historical problems, debates, or periods in American or World history using current methodologies.
  
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    HI 304 - History Study Tour (1-3)

    This course involves directed study of a particular historical period, event, theme, or topic conducted on-site in the United States or abroad in a foreign country. Restricted to history majors and minors. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.
  
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    HI 311 - American Women (3)

    This course explores changing cultural images of women, examines the role of gender in structuring American society, and compares the experiences of American women from a variety of racial and ethnic groups as well as class positions. Additionally, this course includes a discussion of important theoretical and methodological concerns related to women’s and gender history. Meets the upper-division requirement for American History in the history major. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Contribute.
  
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    HI 312 - African-American History (3)

    A survey of the African-American experience in North America, the course examines the evolution of slavery and racism, the methods and movements of resistance, and the creation of African-American communities and cultures from the colonial period to the present. The course stresses African-American agency in shaping their own lives and the history of the United States. Meets the upper-division requirement for American History in the history major.
  
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    HI 321 - Revolutionary Era America (3)

    From the emergence of English colonial communities to riots, rebellions, and the War for Independence, the course examines the causes and consequences of revolution and the perils of nation-building. Meets the upper-division requirement for American History in the history major. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Transform.
  
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    HI 327 - American Frontiers (3)

    This course will examine American history from a variety of perspectives and will interrogate the limits and margins of culture. We will study the concept of the frontier both literally and metaphorically and thus will cast a critical gaze on the geographic, historical, and ideological margins of American society. The course will consider the role of race, class, gender, religion, and other identity categories in the constitution of “the margins” of American culture in the past and present. We will investigate such topics as religious extremism, cultural diversity, and political extremism in order to challenge definitions of the “mainstream” but also to highlight cultural shifts. Meets the upper-division requirement for American History in the history major. 2015 CORE: Belief & Reason, Contribute.
  
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    HI 329 - American Slavery & the Slave Trade (3)

    This course begins with the historical roots of U.S. slavery in the ancient world and West Africa. It covers the Indian slave trade, the Atlantic slave trade, as well as the domestic slave trade. This course will address the diverse policies and practices of slavery and anti-slavery in the U.S. during the colonial, revolutionary, early Republic, antebellum, and Civil War eras. Comparisons with other regions in the western hemisphere will also be offered. Finally, this course will investigate the legacy of slavery in the modern day United States. Meets the upper-division requirement for American History in the history major. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Transform.
  
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    HI 330 - American Empires (3)

    This course focuses on imperialism and colonialism in the Americas. Beginning with the establishment of European empires to U.S. expansion in the 19th century, as well as current debates about expansion and globalization, this class foregrounds the contributions of multiple racial/ethnic groups in forming American culture. Meets the upper-division requirement for American History in the history major.  2015 CORE: Belief & Reason, Contribute.
  
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    HI 332 - Sex & Sexuality in America (3)

    This course examines the history of sex and sexuality in America from pre-colonial Native societies to the modern-day. This class uncovers the ways that ideas of sex and sexuality have changed over time and the impact of constructions of gender and sexuality on marginalized groups with the United States and in a global context. Meets the upper-division requirement for American history in the history major. 2015 CORE: Belief & Reason, Contribute.
  
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    HI 365 - The German Fatherland (3)

    This course explores the transformation of the German-speaking lands from an ambiguous cultural patchwork of feudal lands to a unified, industrial, and culturally diverse empire in the period from 1780 to 1914. Using culture as a central category of historical analysis, special attention is given to the dynamic relationship between German national identity (“the German Fatherland”) and supposed outsiders in German society, such as workers, women, and Jews. Meets the upper-division requirement for World History in the history major. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Contribute.
  
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    HI 366 - The Spectre of Nazism (3)

    This course explores the history of Germany from 1914 to the present, a troubled odyssey of war, revolution, genocide, and reunification. Using culture as a central category of historical analysis, special attention is given to the cultural responses to the changing political landscapes of the German Empire during World War I (1914-1918), the Weimar Republic (1919-1933), Nazi Germany (1933-1945), occupied Germany (1945-1949), the Cold War German states (1949-1990), and reunified Germany since 1990. Meets the upper-division requirement for World History in the history major. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Contribute.
  
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    HI 368 - Red Utopia (3)

    Using culture (especially popular culture) as the central category of historical analysis, this course explores the transformation of Russian society during the Soviet Union (1917-1991) in its effort to create a “New Soviet Human Being” and, thus, a revolutionary, communist utopia. Meets the upper-division requirement for World History in the history major. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Contribute.
  
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    HI 370 - Fairy Tales & Culture (3)

    This course is an exploration of the creation, transmission, and implications of culture to power relations (particularly gender) of fairy tales in modern world history since 1450 C.E. in a global context. Meets the upper-division World History requirement in the history major. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Contribute.
  
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    HI 372 - The Great War (3)

    Using visits to the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial in Kansas City as a central focus, this course is a survey of the origins, experiences, historiographical controversies, and legacies of the First World War (1914-1918) in a global context. Meets the upper-division requirement for World History in the history major. 2015 CORE: Social Justice & Civic Life, Transform, Global Studies.
  
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    HI 373 - The Cold War (3)

    This course is an exploration of the origins, experiences, and legacies of the Cold War (ca. 1945-1991) in a global context. Using culture (especially popular culture) as the central focus of historical analysis, this will examine the role of creativity and culture in support of and in response to the Cold War in a variety of global settings. In addition, this course will include visits to the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum. Meets the upper-division requirement for World History in the history major. 2015 CORE: Creativity & Culture, Contribute. FA.
  
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    HI 380 - Special Topics in History (3)

    This course involves study of specific historical problems, debates, or periods in American or World history using current methodologies.
  
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    HI 396 - Public History (3)

    This course is an introduction to public history, which includes museum administration, archival collection, historic preservation, heritage tourism, oral history, and cultural resource management. Students will examine the theoretical foundations and traditions of public history as a genre of historical inquiry and analyze the major historical debates surrounding public history in general. Building on this foundation, students will then create a synthesis of academic learning and community engagement with the completion of a case study and internship based the needs of a community partner, such as the National World War I Museum at the Liberty Memorial or other local public history site approved by the instructor. Meets the upper-division requirement (American or World) in the major. Prerequisite: Instructor Approval. 2015 CORE: Community Engagement.
  
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    HI 399 - Historical Methods (3)

    This seminar is a research methodologies course that will help prepare students for more advanced work and careers in the field of history. The course will focus on what historians do and how they do it. To that end, the course will help students to develop critical thinking and research skills, plan for careers after graduation, and have a better understanding of the discipline as a whole. Furthermore, students will also learn about integrating technology into the practice of history and the place of technology in the future of historical work. Students must complete this course at Avila University in order to fulfill the Computer Literacy/Technology requirement in the major.
  
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    HI 490 - Directed Study in History (1-3)

    This course involves directed study of a particular historical period, event, theme, or topic. Restricted to history majors and minors. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.
  
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    HI 496 - Internship in History (3)

    The course involves participation in the activities of a historical agency or in a public history research project under supervision of a faculty member or supervisor designated by the faculty. Restricted to history majors and minors. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. 2015 CORE: Community Engagement.
  
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    HI 499 - Senior Thesis (3)

    Building on the foundation of “knowledge” and “theory” gained from upper-level history courses, this capstone seminar in the history major challenges advanced students to pose a historical question based on primary sources, provide a historical context for this research using current secondary literature, and then produce a well-written work and verbal presentation of historical scholarship. Lastly, students enrolled in this course will create an electronic portfolio that serves as the departmental comprehensive examination in the major of history. Meets the Capstone requirement in the major. Must be completed at Avila University. Prerequisite: HI 399 Historical Methods .

Human Resources

  
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    HR 224 - Psychology of Communication (3)

    A hands-on examination of individual differences in receptive and expressive communication with a focus upon increasing awareness of self in the context of group interactions. Prerequisite: PY 101 . PRE-2015 CORE: Level II. FA.
 

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